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Stupid Drug Warrior Tricks

We haven’t heard a whole lot from John Negroponte in a while, but he surfaces in this AP story

Negroponte, a former U.S. ambassador to Mexico who has been working on drug control for 35 years, urged legislators to not be discouraged by the increased violence or drug availability.

“Problems with narcotrafficking remain with us today notwithstanding the enormous blood and treasure that has been expending up and down the length of the hemisphere to deal with these issues,” he said. “So we just all agree that this is a long-term issue to which there are no quick fixes.”

Doesn’t anybody out there actually read this stuff with comprehension? Re-read it. He is saying that we shouldn’t be surprised that all the lives and money spent would result in greater violence and drug availability. And that somehow proves that we should unanimously agree to keep doing it, without considering any other options.

What a loser.

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9 comments to Stupid Drug Warrior Tricks

  • Negroponte is a long-time war criminal and mass murderer, from way back in the Reagan and Reagan days. What a psychopath!! the horrid fact is that he is still doing it, now under the crusade shield of “Drug Warrior.” what a putrid monster he is. and that quote — yes, had to read it twice — is utterly insulting, moronic. It should be the mantra of the cement-headed prohibitionists. Folks, check out my 35-year long frustration at http://www.unionlocal13.org. It’s on home page under editorials by Kate Woods. Love you guys, this is my first post.

  • Paul

    For him to say otherwise would be to admit he was wrong about drug policy all his life. He just can’t do that, and neither can any of the other old drug war dinosaurs.

    I’m hoping the economic problems and disgust with congress in general will clear out most of the old guard. Mind you, it is just a hope, not an expectation. But times are changing, so maybe something new will happen.

  • Foghorn Hogglegg

    Kinda like stupid human tricks on late night with Letterman. If we try the same failed policies over and over we’ll get a different result? (not really.)

  • kaptinemo

    As the fiscal noose tightens, expect more of this. The prohib’s justifications will become ever more streamlined…and moronic. A distillation of stupidity. One which no amount of clever phraseology and talking points will hide. And which will become immediately evident when the prohibs are forced into debate.

    The business of claiming that the cartels causing more carnage is a good thing is a perfect example of overwhelming stupidity; challenge that on its’ face, and the public will know that not all the loons are in the bin, a lot are running loose and making drug policy.

  • Scott

    “So we just all agree that this is a long-term issue to which there are no quick fixes.”

    They continue to portray themselves as a group of people working hard to meet the serious challenges brought forth by a global society hit hard by illegal drugs. You can replace the words “illegal drugs” with simply “crime”, and you get the general job description of the police.

    Their treating of the effort to defeat illegal drugs as part of the overall effort to defeat crime is a solid move on their part. The public (the people they need to keep at bay to keep their policy going) basically knows that crime will never be entirely stopped, but the effort must always continue.

    They need enough of the public to keep believing that to legalize drugs is the same as legalizing all criminal acts.

    That belief is sensible and makes us look crazy, assuming drug prohibition works to a degree similar to crime prevention in general.

    That assumption is extremely vulnerable, and it is the critical point we should be striking hardest against.

    This is why it is so urgent for our movement to firmly and constantly challenge them to prove that drug prohibition works at all, placing the burden-of-proof where it makes sense, on their shoulders (no longer on ours).

    We must continuously point to the disaster proclamation made prior to each penalty reduction (for crying out loud, there are over 30 of them), and politely ask them to provide solid evidence proving any disaster happened.

    We all know that disaster did not occur in Portugal (after decriminalizing all drugs almost a decade ago), California (after making cannabis medically legal almost a decade and a half ago), and so on.

    The bottom line with respect to public perception is perfectly clear:

    If the public no longer believes that disaster is prevented at all by the existence of drug prohibition, they will no longer equate drug prohibition with the continuous effort to defeat crime itself.

    In other words, if drug prohibition is not benefiting society, drug prohibition is not needed.

    That bottom line should lead to our bottom line, which is also perfectly clear:

    We must use our mainstream media interviews, and any other opportunity, to go on the offensive in a composed manner and challenge the prohibitionists to provide solid evidence proving their policy works at all.

    Whatever so-called solid evidence they put forth should prompt a quick reason why such evidence is weak, ended by a return to the original challenge to prove their policy works at all (to keep the public and the interviewer focused on that challenge).

    Putting the burden-of-proof on the prohibitionists’ shoulders is the critical change from our movement fighting the uphill battle to their effort to sustain their policy being the uphill fight against us.

    As anyone familiar with the basics of combat understands, those who fight downhill generally have an advantage.

    It is an extremely sound move on our part. So let us make it!

  • nt109

    Long term issue! Did they say the same thing in the Vietnam war! Lets just keep doing what we are doing while people die and are harmed by these policies and maybe just maybe it might work!!! It hasn’t worked so far but there is this chance it might just magically work! Nice going you moronic drug warriors. Have a cup O’ tea you deserve it you good Ol’ chaps ..

  • Maria

    My Evil Man to Human translator is on the fritz but what I got out of all that was the following.

    “So we can all agree that banging our heads against the wall has not demolished it. But that doesn’t mean we need to stop banging our heads against it. Demolishing this wall is a long-term issue and banging our heads against it is not a quick-fix or short term solution. Just because the wall hasn’t even cracked and you can see bits of my bloodied and exposed brain doesn’t mean that this is the wrong tactic. We might demolish this wall in the future if we keep banging our heads against it, so we will continue until the wall disintegrates.”

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