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September 2009
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Lowered goals

This just struck me as humorous…

U.S. Dept. of Labor sets dates for the 4th annual Drug Free Work Week

The U.S. Department of Labor today encouraged public and private community organizations to participate in the 4th annual Drug-Free Work Week, which will occur Oct. 19 to 25.

So remember, kids, to mark your calendars and don’t go to work stoned that week.

Of course, in reality, I’m in favor of a drug-free workplace, in that people shouldn’t be impaired by drugs (including alcohol) when working (on the other hand, I’m also in favor of people working, as appropriate, when enhanced by drugs — such as jazz musicians).

Also, of course, in reality, the drug-free workplace programs aren’t really about a drug-free workplace. They’re about penalizing people who use certain drugs at any time, even if that use has no connection to work.

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6 comments to Lowered goals

  • Guy#1

    As a jazz student in college, I must say going to Improv class high has helped me a lot.

  • kaptinemo

    At the place where I work, just down the hall from my office, there’s a Copy Room with a medicine cabinet full of commonly available over-the-counter cold remedies in small packs. It’s wide open for general use. Got the sniffles? Got a deadline and can’t take time off? Go to the ‘meds locker’ and get your favorite anti-histamine.

    And of course, there’s free tea and coffee dispensers in every kitchenette, on every floor. All the caffeine you can down.

    “Drug free worklplace”. Puh-leaze. The idea practically drips with hypocrisy…

  • permanentilt

    It is really about reserving the right to reject workman’s comp claims, even if the reason for rejection had absolutely nothing to do with the accident.

    Also the right to fire someone arbitrarily.

  • Lee

    Your comment in this post reminded me of that your kid a couple of years ago that had the idea that jazz musicians played straight and to suggest otherwise was to sully the beauty of jazz.

  • Think about a reptile, five foot long
    A li’l bit high, but not too strong
    You’ll be high – but not for long
    If you’re a viper…

    Well now,
    I’m the king of everything
    Got to get high before I sing
    Sky is high, ever’body’s high
    If you’re a viper…

    If your throat gets dry, you know you’re high
    Everything is dandy
    Truck on down to the candy store
    Bust your conk on some peppermint candy

    Now you know, your body’s sent
    You don’ give a damn if you don’ pay rent
    Light that tea, let it be
    If you’re a viper…
    — Fats Waller, Viper’s Drag

  • Cliff

    “Also, of course, in reality, the drug-free workplace programs aren’t really about a drug-free workplace. They’re about penalizing people who use certain drugs at any time, even if that use has no connection to work.”

    I think it also creates an artificial ‘shortage’ of workers and economically destroys people who happen to consume certain drugs by limiting their RIGHT to participate in the marketplace. It is also a training opportunity for the prison state to showcase its authority and propoganda and allow the good citizens their five minutes of hate.