Why can’t the FBI get high?

Chicago’s FBI Office recently tweeted a reminder to those applying for a job with the venerable agency:

Illinois decriminalizes recreational marijuana on Jan. 1, but #DYK federal laws on marijuana aren’t changing? To apply to #FBI, you’ll still need to be marijuana-free for 3 yrs.

The waiting period for applicants appears to affect regular marijuana consumers along with people working in the marijuana industry and anyone taking Schedule 1 restricted drugs. Current FBI agents and staff face risky hurdles should they need to self-medicate with federally forbidden substances. And what’s with the 3 years? Why anabolic steroids for 10 years? Do J. Edgar Hoover’s specter and COINTEL schemes still haunt the hallowed halls of the Washington FBI building named after him?

Hoover refused to recruit long hairs, bearded men, “pot heads” and people he called “pear heads.” If by pear heads J. Edgar was referring to small-minded people and not just individuals with misshapen craniums, then why can’t the FBI be euphoric over mother nature’s herbal-based wonder drugs that lead to mind expansion and even improved mental health? Or will the US face a bleak future of pear heads in the FBI and other federal agencies?

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18 Responses to Why can’t the FBI get high?

  1. DdC says:

    Happy New Year

    2020

    Every Month
    Has a 4/20

  2. thelbert says:

    happy new year couchmates!

  3. darkcycle says:

    Happy New Year, all!

  4. BrownBarron says:

    May we all go up in smoke!

  5. JessyNelmes says:

    Just in: Jury nullification in the UK

    A multiple sclerosis patient who was facing jail for growing cannabis to ease her pain was acquitted today after the case against her collapsed.

    Lesley Gibson, 55, and her husband, Mark, received not guilty verdicts at Carlisle Crown Court after being charged for possession and cultivation of the class B drug.

    https://tinyurl.com/NullificationUK

    • umma gumma says:

      UK is about ten years behind western europe and US when it comes to drug reform… the Daily Mail etc cast a long shadow.

  6. DdC says:

    ☛ How FIJA Saved My Life!
    http://cannabisnews.com/news/4/thread4055.shtml

    “Jurors have always had the ability to ignore the judge, ignore the law and acquit, jury nullification serves as an important check on government power.”
    –University of Alberta law professor Sanjeev Anand
    Edmonton Sun 1/15/06

    ☛ Illinois’s Legal Pot Sales Reach $3.2 Million on First Day

    ☛ Legal marijuana sales in Illinois hit $5.42 million in first two days

    ☛ 1st day in Chicago jpg

  7. Nigel Nark says:

    The Moroccan government is seriously considering the legalization of cannabis production. Will the USA just stand by and allow an Arab nation to seise the worldwide market?
    https://themediahq.com/the-moroccan-government-agrees-to-discuss-cannabis-growing-bills/

  8. strayan says:

    Alcohol prohibition was, contrary to popular opinion, an extremely successful public health program by a number of different metrics. Reasonable societies can decide if they want the tradeoffs that come with legalization, but only if you are honest about the facts.

    https://twitter.com/badorfman/status/1218198497641537537?s=21

    Prohibition was working, it only needed a few more years!

  9. DdC says:

    Booze Prohibition 1/17/1920 – 12/1933
    One day of sober men,
    Women Got the Right to Vote. 1.18.1920

    Ganja in social settings became more popular
    https://t.co/mLGezvDszZ?amp=1
    Ganja and Empathy
    https://t.co/soH5u4popn?amp=1
    Ganja to Overcome Fear
    https://t.co/r9O86X4kM5?amp=1

    Oh my,
    Authoritarians can’t have that!

    ☛ Marihuana Tax Act of 1937
    ☛ Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (1938)
    ☛ Kefauver Harris Amendment of 1962
    ☛ Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs
    ☛ Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970

    Two federal agencies, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), determine which substances are added to or removed.

    Result: Clinical Endocannabinoid Deficiency

  10. Pingback: Why can’t the FBI get high? « Drug WarRant – Topshelf News

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