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DEA will not demand payment over the phone or internet

From the latest DEA email newsletter…

DID YOU KNOW?

All too frequently criminals pose at DEA Special Agents on the phone or via the internet in an attempt to illegally scam innocent individuals. DEA Special Agents will never demand money or any other form of payment over the phone or the internet. Those who engage in these criminal acts are violating federal law, and there are severe penalties for impersonating a federal law enforcement officer. If you are contacted on the phone or via the internet by an individual who claims to be a DEA Special Agent and demands money, do not send it to them—instead, call our extortion scam hotline at 1-877-792-2873, or click here to find out more information.

Here at the DEA, we will never demand money or any other form of payment from you. We just seize it.

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6 comments to DEA will not demand payment over the phone or internet

  • Duncan20903

    .
    .
    So you mean that I didn’t win $800,000 in a foreign lottery? It was the FBI that sent me the email, does that mean it’s legitimate since it wasn’t from the DEA?

    Sheesh, when I saw the email in my spam box I thought “christ on a crutch, that’s the very definition of the word chutzpa”.

  • DEA has a “extortion scam hotline”!? Um, hello there, yes, I’d like to report a massive ongoing extortion scam. It’s you.

  • darkcycle

    Don’t worry, if they want your shit, they’ll just come and take it. No due process needed. No charges needed. What, so you’re innocent? Never even jay walked? Doesn’t matter, they can take your shit anyway. And they will, when and if they want. E-mail is a courtesy they don’t need to concern themselves with.
    So, if you receive an e-mail, disregard it. If you receive an armed home invasion….well you can be pretty sure it’s authentic.

  • DdC

    Cops used to have a scam where they would call bail jumpers and those with outstanding warrants and tell them they won a free trip or TV or something too good to pass up. When they came to get it they busted them on live TV. I’ve never heard of posing as a DEA Special Agent to scam someone on the phone or internet. Dressing up like a cop and busting people for their money and stash or pulling them over and raping them maybe. This makes no sense. Sounds like something a gullible teabog dippy might fall for but most of them don’t toke so what’s the loss? Weird.

  • DEA has a “extortion scam hotline”!? Um, hello there, yes, I’d like to report a massive ongoing extortion scam. It’s you.

  • So you mean that I didn’t win $800,000 in a foreign lottery? It was the FBI that sent me the email, does that mean it’s legitimate since it wasn’t from the DEA?

    Sheesh, when I saw the email in my spam box I thought “christ on a crutch, that’s the very definition of the word chutzpa”.