Send comments, tips,
and suggestions to:
DrugWarRant
Join us on Pete's couch.
couch

DrugWarRant.com, the longest running single-issue blog devoted to drug policy, is published by the Prohibition Isn't Free Foundation
facebooktwitterrss
August 2010
M T W T F S S
« Jul   Sep »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

Archives

Authors

USA Today: Police don’t actually do any drug enforcement.

Cutbacks force police to curtail calls for some crimes

Budget cuts are forcing police around the country to stop responding to fraud, burglary and theft calls as officers focus limited resources on violent crime.

Notice the glaring omission in that sentence?

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook Post to Reddit Post to StumbleUpon

13 comments to USA Today: Police don’t actually do any drug enforcement.

  • Rhayader

    No this makes perfect sense. It’s a budgetary issue — and enforcing crimes like fraud and burglary has no payoff potential. Drug enforcement though? Asset seizure, state and federal grant money, easily manipulated statistics. It’s a budgetary gold mine.

  • Cannabis

    @Rhayader wins on the first try! Plus, with property crimes you don’t have excellent photo ops like this http://bit.ly/97W8Iv or get to do fun, team-building exercises like rappelling out of helicopters and stuff. If we can get forfeiture laws changed then perhaps law enforcement may get some of their priorities straight.

  • divadab

    Prohibition makes racketeers of the police. No wonder the closure rate for homicides nationally has declined from 90% in 1960 to less than 50% today – they’re spending their time on activity that gives them money and is easier than catching actual criminals.

    The “War on Drugs” is a corrupt oppressive activity by a corrupt and oppressive government.

    And Dianne Feinstein, she who signed the “No” “argument” (of lies) on Prop 19, is exemplary in her corruption and living as part of this oppressive regime.

    What can we say about a government which would put most of the signers of the Declaration of Independence in jail for growing Hemp?

  • ezrydn

    Of course they left it out. It’s their bread and butter that doesn’t entail putting their lives in danger, doing the job they originally thought they wanted to do.

    It’ll be good to see Boxer out this election and it’s Diane’s turn next election. I been wanting to get rid of these two bookends for years. Sounds like Boxer is having a fund-raising problem, per the emails I keep getting. Why doesn’t she just use the proceeds from her book that she was pitching while she should have been holding townhall meetings about health care?

  • OT… FL DPR activist Jodi James wins her Dem primary in Brevard Co. FL w/ 44% of the vote (against 28% and 28%) Veteran Drug Reformer Wins Florida House Primary… and in CA: FOX40 Airs Nation’s First Medical Marijuana Advertisement
    :

    Marijuana is not shown in the advertisement, and the word “marijuana” is never used. Instead, patients and the ad itself refer to pot as “cannabis.”

    Backwards dimwits…

  • wordsworth

    I can’t believe birdcage lining today printed that story.

  • Cliff

    Slightly off topic:

    Another interesting development regarding the Colorado State budget. Governor Bill Ritter held his nose, because he hates medicinal cannabis, and went ahead and used $9 million of funds constitutionally earmarked for the medicinal cannabis community (from fees paid to the state by patients and dispensaries) to balance the state budget.

    Most medicinal cannabis patients are pretty upset about this, because these funds are consitutionally mandated to be used for operating the medicinal cannabis program. I see it another way, this act has officially legitimized medicinal cannabis as a revenue stream. Once the politrixters have tasted money, regardless of its source, they will be counting on that money to continue. It will be interesting to see how this works after HR 1284 passed, requiring many administrative changes to Amendment 20 and a probable decline in revenue from the medicinal cannabis market as those who are forced out will return to the black market with new horticultural skills.

  • Just me.

    Humm….
    Maybe its just that enforcing drug laws are more profitable? Its not like prohibition corrupts or anything…

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100831/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/lt_drug_war_mexico

    Naw! It cant happen here ?! Assest forfitures? A bag full of prohibition caused drug money there for the taking after a raid? DEA seizing property and money but making NO arrests!?

    Any one who think that cartels dont funnel money into our political system to keep prohibition alive..just as lobbists for certain corporations do…well if you dont think it happens ,I got a bridge to sell ya.

    PROHIBITION CORRUPTS ALL !

    Corruption: A desease that spares NO ONE

  • Dante

    As the news reports of police departments SCREAMING at the world that cutting back on police salaries will lead to armageddon and chaos and other bad stuff, the FBI reports that violent crime is down again. It’s a national trend, having nothing to do with staffing at the local cop shop. Meanwhile, the police in my town all have 3 houses and vacation in the south of France.

    Keep cutting. I like the sound of pigs squealing.

  • kaptinemo

    The economy is like a meat-grinder, and ‘public services’ like police are on a conveyor belt towards that meat-grinder with glacial – but inexorable – slowness.

    But, it things suddenly become worse, well, then that conveyor belt will speed up. And then you’ll hear some real squealing. Because that’s the point where drug prohibition will actually be named by the pols (they’ve been avoiding the words, as many here will attest) and then the cats will truly be out of the bag. The big, mean, mangy ones.

    And any cops who complain about cut-backs in their ‘anti-drug’ operations will be told exactly what anyone else is in this economy who’s still employed: Quit your bitchin’, shut up and be glad you have a job.

    It’s coming. Soon. And it’s going to be either re-legalize or face total fiscal collapse. REAL collapse, the kind that foments revolutions. And nobody sane wants that…

  • darkcycle

    C’mon. Don’t talk about taking away the gravy-work. Cops love citizen funded helecopoter sight-seeing tours. Plant eradication is good exercise in the summer sun. They never have to confront the growers, who’d have to be stone deaf and blind to miss their approach. And busting teenagers for weed is a friday night institution. Pot heads never put up a fight… are you suggesting they go out and mix it up with a bunch of real criminals? That could be dangerous. And what excuse will they have for bursting into people’s homes in the middle of the night with automatic weapons and flash-bangs!
    Don’t you see? Ending the drug war will be such a drag for our boys in blue that they can’t stand to mention it. When they talk about lack of resources curtailing certain calls, they only mean calls where there is a victim. ‘Cause victims are a big whining drag.

  • TrebleBass

    And even as no one mentions the obvious fact that drug laws are still being enforced, fear mongering against drugs still finds a way to surface:

    “The chiefs are putting the best face on this they can,” Pasco said. “But think of this: that next property crime could involve a junkie who killed someone the night before.”

  • Kram

    I am curious. With all of the new surveillance technology out there, where are all of the savings we were supposed to have? Red light cameras, highway cameras, etc. and yet all we ever hear is that “we can cut police jobs!” Hmmm….