Send comments, tips,
and suggestions to:
DrugWarRant
Join us on Pete's couch.
couch

DrugWarRant.com, the longest running single-issue blog devoted to drug policy, is published by the Prohibition Isn't Free Foundation
facebooktwitterrss
October 2008
M T W T F S S
« Sep   Nov »
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Archives

Authors

Odds and Ends and thread

“bullet” Evan G at D’Alliance with Hey Mom and Dad: Thanks for the Dog covers the latest effort in causing long-term damage to developing the notion of a free society in our youth: renting drug dogs to sniff your teen’s bedroom and possessions.
“bullet” Alix at Art of the Possible has a detailed post on Meth and public policy: Yes, an article on the ups and downs of the alleged meth epidemic
A couple of points of interest in it. One, this delightful quote from the Oregonion on how to create a meth panic article

Start your article with an anecdote, preferably one about a user who testifies about how methamphetamine destroyed his life. Toss out some statistics to indicate that meth use is growing, even if the squishy numbers don‰t prove anything. Avoid statistics that cut against your case. Use and reuse the words ‹problemŠ and ‹epidemicŠ without defining them. Quote law enforcement officers extensively, whether they know what they‰re talking about or not. Avoid drug history except to make inflammatory comparisons between meth and other drugs. Gather grave comments from public-health authorities but never talk to critics of the drug war who might add an unwanted layer of complexity to your story.

And Two, what should be even more the focus of the article:

It was the Federal Drug Abuse Control Amendments of 1965 which actually made illegal production of speed a profitable business. Prior to that, ‹illicit speed labs had to compete with diverted legal tablets priced at wholesale as low as thirteen or fourteen tablets for a pennyšš 75 cents per thousand.Š After the government intervened, the amphetamines that even JFK once regularly took became harder to legally acquire, but they could still found on the streets.

That’s exactly why meth has what little popularity it has today. It is a byproduct of prohibition. In fact, it is a byproduct of particularly stringent prohibition. Illegal, yet easily diverted, and much safer, amphetamines would reduce the lure of meth.
It’s just like the often volatile alcohol stills that sprung up during the other prohibition.
“bullet” I’ve been meaning, and neglecting, to link to Lee’s article on Afghanistan over at HorsesAss: Chasing the Dragon in Afghanistan. Definitely worth a read.

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook Post to Reddit Post to StumbleUpon

Comments are closed.