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Bolivia takes on the INCB, Biden practices his Spanish

The International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) is a rogue organization loosely connected to the UNODC, with essentially no oversight and operating in secrecy. It’s on the list of organizations that I will designate as terrorist organizations when I become President.

As many of you know, Bolivia recently withdrew from the Single Convention because they were going to be required to outlaw non-cocaine uses of coca leaves in contradiction of Bolivian heritage and Constitution. They intend to re-ratify the convention with an exception for traditional coca usage.

Well, the INCB recently made a bunch of noise about how Bolivia is essentially wrecking drug policy for the rest of the world (even though all Bolivia wants to do is live up to their cultural commitments to aboriginal rights, etc.).

This prompted this rather strongly worded letter from Bolivia to the INCB.

The fact that, according to your note, the purpose of the mission was to analyze “the grave consequences for international drug control” of our political decision makes it clear that the mission apparently arrived in our country already prejudiced. This is the same prejudice which was publicly expressed by the INCB in its press statement of 6 July 2011, where it is mentioned that “such approach would undermine the integrity of the global drug control system”. Your letter simply repeats the position that the President of the INCB had already embraced, without examining in a serious manner the arguments which have been explained to you in great detail during your visit. […]

The Plurinational State of Bolivia regrets that the Board has failed to understand and reflect the firm will of the Bolivian government to continue to be part of the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs of 1961. This is why it feels forced to express its utmost rejection of the disqualifications expressed in your note, which fail to ponder on the conclusive and unprecedented results of the Bolivian commitment to control the surplus coca cultivation and the illicit drugs trade. […]

We categorically reject the claims and erroneous opinions expressed in your note in the sense that the Plurinational State of Bolivia has the intention of undermining the integrity of the international drug control system, as it has been wrongly interpreted. […]

Moreover, I am obligated to categorically object to the erroneous inference on the part of the Board when confusing the unilateral accession-with-reservation procedure with a supposed intentionality regarding the reclassification of the coca leaf in List I of the Convention of 1961. In this manner, the INCB seeks to discredit and convolute the intention of the Plurinational State of Bolivia that is well aware of the legal dispositions established in the Conventions for this purpose and the difference between these, and the process begun in June with the denunciation.

This may sound like complex and dry, but it really is quite blistering in foreign-policy-speak.

With Latin America speaking up almost in one voice in favor of talks about legalization, forcing the U.S. to send Joe Biden down there in some futile attempt to quash a rebellion of ideas.

Danny Kushlick, who heads the London-based Transform Drug Policy Foundation, said the region is “on the verge of a tipping point that will begin when the Latin Americans raise the issue within earshot and in full view of the Americans. Ultimately this is about allowing democratic conversations to take place without being leaned upon by the U.S.”

Latin America is feeling bolder, and Bolivia has no reason to act subservient to the INCB.

The U.S. hold on the drug war is noticeably slipping. It still holds the high ground in power, but has definitely lost the moral high ground that it once appeared to have, and the grumbling is getting louder (and it won’t be completely silenced by Joe Biden and the checkbook he’ll be bringing).

I’ve noticed that Biden’s been almost invisible so far in the Obama Presidency, and so has stayed out of trouble. This little trip to Latin America would be an interesting time for one of his trademark gaffes.

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9 comments to Bolivia takes on the INCB, Biden practices his Spanish

  • Benjamin

    Oh, a Biden-ism on this trip could be delicious. “People of Central America: we come in peace! Unless you are near a drug of some sort, heheheh, amirite?!?!”

  • claygooding

    Reductions in drug war money brought this on,,while the US is increasing it’s drug war budget they are cutting a lot of SA countries grant monies and expecting them to pick up the rest.

    As Kapt has said,,the money is biting them in the ass.

  • kaptinemo

    Been saying for years here that it will be the Latin American nations that start the rout from the Single Convention Treaty. And here it is. The UNODC’s arrogance is finally paying off, and the Bolivians have been handed a golden opportunity to leave the SCA with no small degree of national pride intact – and in parting give the UNODC (and by derivation, all DrugWarriors everywhere) a roundhouse slap, the kind that echoes and leaves purple bruises. Watch the other LA nations to follow suit. ‘Tipping point’ indeed.

  • ezrydn

    I expect it to be a big topic here after the mid-year elections. And, especially if PRI regains control. A “backyard” caucus would be interesting for the US.

  • darkcycle

    *smiles*

  • I sell coca tea here in Caracas, Venezuela; thousands of people drink the Triple 3X Coca Tea that I prepare all of them receive immediate benefits that cannot be debated.

    It is ridiculous to ban the coca leaf simply because it is the raw material from which cocaine is derived. If this were the real reason behind the ban they would also have to ban cold medicine that is available at any grocery store which has become the raw material used for producing crystal meth which is 10x more dangerous than cocaine.

    The fact of the matter is that the coca leaf is a threat to giant corporations because it prevents diseases like high blood pressure and osteoporosis. Watch out ADM, Colgate, Monsanto and Merck, the people have access to the information that politicians and corporations are trying to cover up about the leaf.

  • I have been wathching the media here in the US for the reporting of these events surrounding Biden’s visit. Some of the larger sources such as MSNBC are making it sound as if Joe is coming down to embrace the idea of legalization talks. I wonder why they are reporting from this position……..it obviously is not true, in fact the opposite. Anyone have any ideas on this ?