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April 2011
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Javier Sicilia Wakes Up Mexico

… from NarcoNews TV

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16 comments to Javier Sicilia Wakes Up Mexico

  • denmark

    Javier Sicilia, wow, thank you.

    Sane people of the globe will end this ridiculous drug war and you are one of them Javier.

    • strayan

      Ghastly.

      Insane drug warriors are up to their armpits in blood now. Soon they will drown in it.

    • strayan

      And if you were a real sicko you would consider mass graves a sign of success.

    • kaptinemo

      And as usual, you have to wonder how many more mass graves are there?

      But, as has been pointed out, those who refuse to acknowledge their own part in this mess, the prohibs, will call this a ‘victory’.

      Maybe if you are a racially bigoted eugenicist, as the first drug prohibs were, it’s a victory. Latter day ones have no such ‘excuse’…but they’ll continue to spin this as an example of their ‘success’.

      Only in a DrugWar Wonderland could such mass murder be seen as a justification for maintaining policy that produces such horrific results; anyone else with brains can see this for what is is. And Leonhart is no effin’ Alice.

  • Jake

    In this vid @43s in someone is holding a banner saying “legalise drugs already”.. I had heard/read somewhere that some parts of the protests were looking to make deals with the cartels to return to ‘honour’ i.e. stop the killings of innocents.. anyone with a bit more insight know if the message is a bit confused (as in between wanting to stop the violence but some not recognising the true cause as being prohibition)? Either way, massive credit to those out on the streets protesting!!

  • This is not my America

    The end to this insane drug war will come from the people …not government. Government cares not for our suffering…only the power the drug war can give them.

  • ezrydn

    The people down here are truly tired of the killings, the “WOD,” everything! Yes, that’s what the banner said.

    Mexico did their “decriminalize” bit but handed it off to the States to impliment within 3-5 years so nothing’s really happening there. Good stuff is still ’69 price/lid.

    The Government COULD stop it, but they won’t. They’re still of the “tail of the dog” mentality. After all, the Government built what we have here. Now, they can’t figure out how to stop it “their way.” Well, listen to the People, they seem to have an idea!

  • vicky vampire

    Wow, we have have gone from sad Ides of march to rainy April maybe a full flowering coming in May of common sense around the world cool Javier, Yeah stick that up your Derrieres and smoke it Drug Czar Gil and DEA Bitch Michelle

  • Malcolm Kyle

    (Reuters) – Mexican security forces arrested 16 municipal police officers accused of protecting drug gang hitmen who massacred dozens of people near the U.S. border, the country’s Attorney General said on Wednesday.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/04/14/us-mexico-drugs-idUSTRE73D0Q620110414

  • kaptinemo

    More on this from BorderlandBeat:

    San Fernando update: 16 municipal police arrested, official body count up to 126

    Like I said, they suspect that hundreds, maybe even thousands more have been ‘disappeared’ (the way the old Sovs used to).

    • darkcycle

      “The three o’clock knock” is an old Central and South American tradition, Nemo. The Sovs probably learned it from the Argentines.

  • primus

    If all the Latin American countries were to withdraw from the UN Single Convention, it would be seen as what it is; an attempt by the US to force the rest of the world to adopt the worst possible policy relative to fun-drug production, sale and use, namely prohibition. Until they do so, the remarks made by past presidents ring hollow. Why did Mr. Fox not go ahead with decriminalization when he had the chance to do so as President? Actions speak louder than words, and his words today can never make up for his inaction then.

  • Hope

    Actually, and I could be wrong, but it seems I recall Fox did want to legalize, or at least, decriminalize, at least, cannabis when he was President of Mexico.

    I know I remember that it was discussed in their Federal legislature and lots of them were ready to do legalizing, but the US “discouraged” it, vehemently, and then pretty soon after that all hell broke loose and it was pretty much forgotten in the uproar. 9/11 happened.

  • ya know… sometimes people can be talking on one subject and their words take on a much broader context. I was reading this article by Chris Hedges, Why The United States Is Destroying Its Education System and his ending seemed like he was talking about drug policy: and it seemed to fit this post in particular

    The truly educated become conscious. They become self-aware. They do not lie to themselves. They do not pretend that fraud is moral or that corporate greed is good. They do not claim that the demands of the marketplace can morally justify the hunger of children or denial of medical care to the sick. They do not throw 6 million families from their homes as the cost of doing business. Thought is a dialogue with one’s inner self. Those who think ask questions, questions those in authority do not want asked. They remember who we are, where we come from and where we should go. They remain eternally skeptical and distrustful of power. And they know that this moral independence is the only protection from the radical evil that results from collective unconsciousness. The capacity to think is the only bulwark against any centralized authority that seeks to impose mindless obedience. There is a huge difference, as Socrates understood, between teaching people what to think and teaching them how to think. Those who are endowed with a moral conscience refuse to commit crimes, even those sanctioned by the corporate state, because they do not in the end want to live with criminals—themselves.

    “It is better to be at odds with the whole world than, being one, to be at odds with myself,” Socrates said.

    Those who can ask the right questions are armed with the capacity to make a moral choice, to defend the good in the face of outside pressure. And this is why the philosopher Immanuel Kant puts the duties we have to ourselves before the duties we have to others. The standard for Kant is not the biblical idea of self-love—love thy neighbor as thyself, do unto others as you would have them do unto you—but self-respect. What brings us meaning and worth as human beings is our ability to stand up and pit ourselves against injustice and the vast, moral indifference of the universe. Once justice perishes, as Kant knew, life loses all meaning. Those who meekly obey laws and rules imposed from the outside—including religious laws—are not moral human beings. The fulfillment of an imposed law is morally neutral. The truly educated make their own wills serve the higher call of justice, empathy and reason. Socrates made the same argument when he said it is better to suffer wrong than to do wrong.

    “The greatest evil perpetrated,” Hannah Arendt wrote, “is the evil committed by nobodies, that is, by human beings who refuse to be persons.”

    As Arendt pointed out, we must trust only those who have this self-awareness. This self-awareness comes only through consciousness. It comes with the ability to look at a crime being committed and say “I can’t.” We must fear, Arendt warned, those whose moral system is built around the flimsy structure of blind obedience. We must fear those who cannot think. Unconscious civilizations become totalitarian wastelands.

    “The greatest evildoers are those who don’t remember because they have never given thought to the matter, and, without remembrance, nothing can hold them back,” Arendt writes. “For human beings, thinking of past matters means moving in the dimension of depth, striking roots and thus stabilizing themselves, so as not to be swept away by whatever may occur—the Zeitgeist or History or simple temptation. The greatest evil is not radical, it has no roots, and because it has no roots it has no limitations, it can go to unthinkable extremes and sweep over the whole world.”

    Kinda fits huh? As Babylon’s facade wears thin (and then wears off) we could end up discovering we all are fighting the same fight, just w/in the realm of our own interests, and that the greatest ploy of the Mammonites has been to keep us divided, calling each other names and squabbling over inanities twixt each other…

    Anyone have any good “Eat the Rich” recipes?

    Ah… and if education and where it’s headed is of interest, read all of Hedge’s piece, it’s well worth the time.