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October 2003
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Numbers are tricky things…

In this week’s DrugSense Weekly Newsletter:
A picture named numbers.gif

While the dangers and horrible effects of prohibited drugs are given great play in the press, when government-paid “experts” are found to have exaggerated “facts” little attention is paid. In New Zealand last week, a government scientist who promotes drug testing was forced to admit she had exaggerated by some 244% the number of drug users detected by random tests. The government’s “expert”, Dr Susan Nolan, twice testified to court last week that drugs were found in 22 percent of samples collected from workers tested. But when called on it, the government-hired expert conceded that only 9 percent contained drugs, not 22 percent as she had originally testified. The 244% mistake (in the government’s favor) was merely a “copying error,” explained Nolan.

You know, that happens to me all the time. I mean to type a “9” and end up hitting the “2” key twice instead. Easy mistake.

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